Category Archives: List

A Calm-Down Collection for the Highly Anxious Poet


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As a writer who struggles with anxiety almost daily, I know all too well the potential anxiety present within the occupation of being a writer. Negative reviews, deadlines, the idea of actually having to read work aloud, etc., can be overwhelming, especially within a larger context of social anxiety or generalized anxiety. That being said, I’ve found that the very source of some of my anxieties, writing/being an author, can also lead to a great deal of peace and calm.

This is a kind of poetic care package for writers who struggle with anxiety, whether career-induced or not. XO

1.

Although Shel Silverstein is always good for an easy, calming read, I’ve found that this little poem by Ellen Bass is my go-to for rough days. “You say, yes, I will take you/I will love you, again.”

2.

Edwin Bodney’s spoken word poem “When a Boy Tells You He Loves You” is full of beautiful, calming figurative language, and his voice is so soothing too.

3.

When I’m overwhelmed about writing a piece about trauma or when I have too many interviews or side projects on my plate, gifs like this breathing-in-sync one help calm me down in the moment.

4.

Just like the gifs, videos of so-called “pen porn,” or people writing words and phrases in gorgeous handwriting or calligraphy, place me into a relaxing, quiet state, and some of them even come with music too.

5.

A few semesters ago, I wrote a paper about famous “reclusive” authors and their tendencies to stay out of the limelight. Reading up on them helped me realize that wanting to live a quiet life, or having difficulty interacting with the media, publicists, and other members of a writing team, is normal and not in any way “weird” or unacceptable.



Contributing Editor


Meggie Royer is a writer and photographer from the Midwest who is currently majoring in Psychology at Macalester College. Her poems have previously appeared in Words Dance Magazine, The Harpoon Review, Melancholy Hyperbole, and more. She has won national medals for her poetry and a writing portfolio in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, and was the Macalester Honorable Mention recipient of the 2015 Academy of American Poets Student Poetry Prize.


National Poetry Month Roundup

2016’s National Poetry Month has come to a firm close and most of the writers I know who’ve participated are happy to see it off. We can all put down the caffeine and apologize to our friends for making metaphors out of their relationship problems. It’s tough work getting out one solid poem a day for an entire month. There’s little time to edit or second-guess what you’re writing and for some of us, the inspiration doesn’t last throughout the whole month (although there’s no shortage of prompts to be found during this time of year). But out of the sweat and tears of emerging and establishing poets (once you sort through the mess of half-written pieces and untitled prose), there’s something organic about the poetry that gets rushed out in April. I like to think it’s something about necessity, something earnest and desperate, urgent to get on the page. In the spirit of that, here’s a round up of some of my favorite poems from this year’s National Poetry Month.


1/30
by Lydia Havens



2/30
by Yena Sharma Purmasir



7/30
by Sarah Gehring



14/30
by Lora Mathis



16/30
by Cecilie K.



17/30
by Irene Vazquez



18/30
by Emma Tranter



22/30
by Rudy Francisco



27/30
by Ari Eastman



29/30
by Kelsey Danielle



Contributing Editor


Trista Mateer is a writer and poet living outside of Baltimore, Maryland. She believes in lipstick, black tea, and owning more books than she can ever possibly read. Known for her eponymous blog, she is also the author of two collections of poetry.


The Witchy Lit Goodie Bag: Literary Essentials for Every Witch

Contents:

2 Fantastic Witchy Quotes

3 Famous Witches

3 Interview Questions with Kate Garrett,
Witch Enthusiast & Managing Editor at Three Drops from a Cauldron

1 Witchy Slam Poem


2 Fantastic Witchy Quotes

i. “I do so love my witches and wicked queens. I find myself drawn to feminine archetypes that previous generations have found threatening or dangerous: crones, oracles, madwomen, Amazons, virgins who aren’t helpless, bad mothers. I love to give the vagina dentata voice. It so rarely gets to speak for itself.” – Catherynne M. Valente

ii. “Most witches don’t believe in gods. They know that the gods exist, of course. They even deal with them occasionally. But they don’t believe in them. They know them too well. It would be like believing in the postman.” – Terry Pratchett


3 Famous Witches

1. Catherine Monvoison

Catherine Monvoison was an alleged French witch, the wife of a jeweler, who was known for her premonitions stemming from childhood. Starting off as a fortune teller, she eventually began selling her clients amulets, aphrodisiacs, and poisons, and reportedly held black masses and lavish parties. One of her many lovers was an executioner, and she ironically died at the hands one, consumed in fire, in public after her arrest for witchcraft.

2. Merga Bien

Merga Bien was a victim of the Fulda Witch Trials in 1603-1605. She had three husbands and was an heiress of the first two. After becoming pregnant, she was accused of having sex with the Devil and killing her former husbands and children, and was forced to confess that she had attended a black sabbath. Despite her third husband’s protests, Merga was burned at the stake in 1603.

3. Agnes Waterhouse (Mother Waterhouse)

Agnes Waterhouse, an English witch, was accused of killing livestock and bringing sickness to others in her town, including her own husband. Her daughter, Joan, was also accused of witchcraft but was not found guilty. Agnes eventually confessed to having a familiar disguised as a cat named Satan, who was later turned into a toad. She was ultimately hanged, becoming the first woman executed for witchcraft in England.


3 Interview Questions with Kate Garrett, Witch Enthusiast & Managing Editor at Three Drops from a Cauldron

1. Where does your enthusiasm about, and passion for, writing about witches come from?

Childhood – I’ve obsessed with fantasy, folklore and fairytales all my life. Also the fact that I took up paganism for myself around age 17 (some time ago now, I’m 36 this year), and some time before I’d found out my great-grandmother was an Appalachian granny woman (sometimes known as a ‘granny witch’). She was a Christian though, so I’m not sure how she’d have felt about the ‘witch’ part. Still, she always healed her 14 children with plant concoctions, had startling premonitions, and delivered babies for other women, among other things, so if the title fits…

2. Do you have any favorite witchy facts?

Loads! But it really interests me that amongst the many misogynist reasons that women could long ago be tried as witches, one was being involved in drunken arguments or pub fights. This was something I’ve come across in particular regarding the Scottish witch trials in the 1600s – a number of women were put to death just for having “fiery temperaments”. I know a lot of women who’d be seen as condemnable by those standards – thankfully things have (mostly) changed.

3. If you could create a spell that would do anything in the world you wanted it to do, what would that spell be?

It’s probably selfish on some level, but a spell to make sure my children are always protected, at least until they’re all adults and able to completely fend for themselves. World peace and all that would be lovely, but if I’m being honest, my first instinct is with my kiddos.


1 Witchy Slam Poem

Witch Hunt” by Arati Warrier

Arati explores the discrimination and prejudice faced by queer women of color in this powerful poem that uses sorcery and witchcraft-related language.



Contributing Editor


Meggie Royer is a writer and photographer from the Midwest who is currently majoring in Psychology at Macalester College. Her poems have previously appeared in Words Dance Magazine, The Harpoon Review, Melancholy Hyperbole, and more. She has won national medals for her poetry and a writing portfolio in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, and was the Macalester Honorable Mention recipient of the 2015 Academy of American Poets Student Poetry Prize.


Another Rape Poem: A List of Poems That Break the Silence on Sexual Assault + Rape Culture

Trigger Warning: rape, sexual assault, sexual violence.

I’ve been thinking a lot about rape poems, how people basically view them as a trope of the genre at this point, how almost every poet I know has one—whether they use the R-word or not, whether it’s about them or a friend or just the culture we live in. I have one in my second book. For the longest time, I felt guilty about writing another one. Like I’d already used up my opportunity, like if I didn’t have something particularly new to say about the topic, then I shouldn’t bother bringing it up again. But for the last month, it’s been almost all I could write about. Some months are just like that. You know how you can’t shake things, sometimes? I put that poem in my book because I didn’t want to see feedback about it on the internet. I didn’t want to see the tags or the comments. But, man, it’s 2016. People are rallying behind Kesha, Biden is speaking out about sexual violence, Gaga is performing about it on the Oscars. Still, when I posted a new piece about rape on my blog last week, it took about about ten minutes for someone to tag it with “you should have just said yes.”

Those first nine minutes felt great though; so here are roughly twenty-five minutes on catharsis, validation, healing, and social commentary. Here’s another rape poem:


“Another Rape Poem” by Brenna Twohy

“I am tired of hearing rape poems the same way soldiers are tired of hearing their own guns go off. Believe me, we all wish the war was over. But friend, you are staring out at a world on fire complaining about how ugly you think the ashes are. The poems are not the problem.”



“American Rape Culture” by Desireé Dallagiacomo & FreeQuency

“In less than forty years, rape has gone from ‘punishable by death’ to ‘qualifier’: rape joke, rape song, rape scene. From birth, American Culture teaches children what gender they will be: perpetrator or victim.”



“Piñata” by Pages Matam

“To the man on the bus I overheard in conversation tell a woman, presumably a friend, ‘you are too ugly to be raped.’ Dear man on the bus, tell the one in five women of this country that they are beautiful, their four counterparts spared torment, ugly.”


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“Say No” by Megan Falley & Olivia Gatwood

“Somewhere, a girl is told that if she doesn’t want to hear the song about rape, don’t listen to it; but it follows her in the supermarket, the gym, the girls’ clothing aisle and now she knows all the words.”



“Go Away” by Hieu Minh Nguyen & Ollie Schminkey

“You are asking me if my sexuality is a side effect. You are asking me where I came from. You are asking what made me this way. I do not need a diagnosis. I do not need an origin story. I do not need to explain my existence. I was not made this way. My rapist is not a god.”



“People You May Know” by Kevin Kantor

“Two police officers told me that I must give his act a name or it didn’t happen, that obviously I could have fought back. Which is to say, no one comes running for young boys who cry rape. When I told my brother, he also asked me why I didn’t fight back. Adam, I am. Right now. I promise.”



“One Color” by Neil Hilborn & Ollie Schminkey

“We teach that rape is always a man in an alley. Always a clenched jaw and a closed fist. Always a stained white shirt. But I never used my pepper spray. I never had to worry about an uncle or a locker room. Do not confuse one story for all stories.”



“Paper Dolls” by Sierra DeMulder

“Nothing was stolen from you. Your body is not a hand-me-down and there is nothing that sits inside you holding your worth. No locket that can be seen or touched, fucked from your stomach to be left on the concrete.”



Contributing Editor


Trista Mateer is a writer and poet living outside of Baltimore, Maryland. She believes in lipstick, black tea, and owning more books than she can ever possibly read. Known for her eponymous blog, she is also the author of two collections of poetry.


5 Controversial Poets

1.


(source)

Aram Saroyan

Saroyan’s one line, seven letter poem “lighght,” consisting solely of that single word in the middle of a blank piece of paper, was published in numerous literary journals, including The Chicago Review and The American Literary Anthology. Despite being published in the mid-60’s, “lighght” is still considered one of the most controversial poems in history, with many readers debating whether it should even be called a poem. Even Reagan spoke about it several times.


2.


(source)

Pablo Neruda

What many literary enthusiasts may not know about this famous Argentinian poet is that his controversial nature doesn’t arise solely from his political leanings or allegiance to Salvador Allende. In one of his own passages from Memoirs, Neruda graphically recounts how he raped a Tamil woman while he was a diplomat in Ceylon (now known as Sri Lanka).


3.


(source)

Siegfried Sassoon

An English poet, writer, and soldier, Sassoon continually issued anti-war declarations throughout World War II, and barely avoided a military trial for his actions by being sent to a psychiatric hospital for treatment. In 1918, he released a collection of anti-war poems called Counter-Attack to much controversy and acclaim.


4.


(source)

Amiri Baraka

The New Jersey Poet Laureate in August 2002, Baraka penned and recited his poem “Somebody Blew Up America,” which alleged that the Israelis and President Bush foresaw 9/11 before it happened. Many legislators and government officials called for his resignation as New Jersey Poet Laureate, but Baraka refused.


5.


(source)

Shel Silverstein

Silverstein’s books of children’s poetry A Light in the Attic and Where the Sidewalk Ends were banned from several elementary schools in several states on the basis of their “promotion” of “drug use, the occult, suicide, death, violence,” and even cannibalism. Despite these accusations, Silverstein’s works have sold millions of copies.


Contributing Editor


Meggie Royer is a writer and photographer from the Midwest who is currently majoring in Psychology at Macalester College. Her poems have previously appeared in Words Dance Magazine, The Harpoon Review, Melancholy Hyperbole, and more. She has won national medals for her poetry and a writing portfolio in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, and was the Macalester Honorable Mention recipient of the 2015 Academy of American Poets Student Poetry Prize.


Poets-to-Watch on Tumblr

Tumblr has become a sweet little nest for poets to post their work & we all have our favorite poets to follow. Here are five up-and-coming poets whose blogs will have you lost in words for hours & an excerpt of their work. Enjoy.

1. Kiki Nicole


excerpt from 2015 after Clementine Von Radics

“This year I refused to become a ghost
and look what’s become of me”

2. Salma Deera


excerpt from The Five Stages of Love

“TELL ME, WHAT IS IT YOU THINK YOU’LL FIND IN HIS EYES? 

IF IT’S LOVE, YOU’RE RIGHT.

IF IT’S SHELTER, YOU’RE WRONG.”

3. Yasmin Z.


excerpt from a loud heart’s silence

“I’m sorry about the years spent

in the wrong state.

And I’m sorry about the highway
and the day you realized the moon
wasn’t following you back home.

And I’m sorry about the dark,

how it happened so fast.”

4. Jessica Therese


excerpt from The Dictionary: An Extended Edition

“Language, you have betrayed me.

There are memories of snow, of rain,

of sound that

you cannot conquer.”

5. Megan Rockett


excerpt from 2015 after Fortesa Latifi

“It is March and I am trying to piece myself back together. I am taking care of myself the best that I can and swearing on my own heart that I’ll stop wearing it on my worn, mascara-stained sleeve.”



Contributing Editor


Fortesa Latifi is a 22-year old poet. Her first book, This Is How We Find Each Other was published through Where Are You Press in 2014. She hopes you find something good here. She knows you will.


Poetry Findings of the Winter


As autumn descends into winter and we all begin to bundle up for the holiday season, I wanted to pull together some of the best videos and pieces of poetry I’ve found over the few months that have thawed me of this winter cold and left me in awe.



(click here to watch on youtube)

The Summer I Turned Twenty by Ashe Vernon

Ashe Vernon’s performance of her poem “The Summer I Turned Twenty” is one that captivates and breaks you at the same time. The rawness and the anger in her voice is something so powerful, the pain almost mirroring an earthquake. This performance is one that I will never forget any time soon.


James Andrew Crosby

James Andrew Crosby creates a whole range of visual poetry in a simple and beautiful format, with small bursts of honest poetry which blends the themes of heartbreak, love and yearning in a perfect balance.



(click here to watch on youtube)

Polos by Katie Ailes

Katie Ailes’ latest spoken word video, Polos, is a beautiful representation of spoken word combined with dance. The poem itself expresses the themes of insecurity and body issues within reflection upon a dance teacher in a beautiful and engaging way through the combining of these art forms.


Occupied by Ghosts by Taylor Pavolillo

Taylor Pavolillo’s zine Occupied by Ghosts examines the experience of loss and the pain and suffering that arrives within the aftermath. Accompanied by delicate photography that represents idyllic houses, this zine underlines the struggle of moving on without wanting to leave the past behind, and the gaping hole that you consume yourself in with this loss.


Contributing Editor


Jade Mitchell is an 18 year old poet / writer who resides near Glasgow, Scotland. Her work has been featured in The Grind Journal, Inky Paper and Ink Scotland. Aside from working on her writing and poetry, you can find her listening to Lorde and reading every poem she can find in sight.


Cypher (Explicit)

Cipher:

n. a message written in a secret code
v. convert ordinary language into code; “We should encode the message for security reasons” (The Free Dictionary)


Cypher:

n. Anything cyclical. If your freestyling, you rap in a cypher (one after the other). Interrupting another man will break that cypher (unless he’s next in line and the dude behind him is falling off).[…] Never break the damn cipher (Urban Dictionary)

People of color are more likely to be blinded by police lights than spotlight. We’re more likely to turn up dead Saturday night than just turn up. There are three things that made me want to make this post. First, that I needed to pull together a portfolio and these videos remind me that poetry doesn’t just come to you through page and mic, but in everything you come in contact with if you listen hard enough. Second, Zola’s twitter story about sex trafficking, attempted suicide, and violence going viral. And how, while it’s hilarious and well-written, it’s a perfect reflection of how people of color talk about trauma as if it’s an everyday occurrence, because it is. Third, this is a language I understand very well. It’s the exact opposite of Chen Chen’s The School of Fury. My family raised us on words, on quick quips and wit, on beats that thunder so loud our hearts’ teeth chatter. Listening to cyphers feels like coming home and in a world that wants us gone, it’s one of the safest, most powerful feelings I’ll ever get. Despite a world that demands our silence, these artists speak their truth and speak it loud, and in this post, I want us all to listen.

Broader Than Broadway: Lin-Manuel Miranda, Renee Elise Goldsberry, Daveed Diggs, and Black Thought


This is the one that got me falling down the rabbit hole. My sister and I are huge fans of theatre but most of the people we know laughed it off, called us Oreos for loving such “whiteness”. Watching this cypher made theatre an “us” thing, a black people can have this too thing, a speaking up isn’t just for white people thing and that’s real important.


The Cypher: Tech N9ne, B.O.B., Kendrick Lamar and Machine Gun Kelly

“If you ain’t reppin for your people
then you shuckin and jivin”


(click here to watch on YouTube)


BET Hip-Hop Awards 2014 Cypher: Mook, Arsonal, Calicoe, Couture, and Plus Loaded Lux

“So they through me to the lions’ pit,
I came back with the lion
Taught it how to sit”


(click here to watch on YouTube)


2012 Ruff Ryder Cypher: DMX, Eve, Cassidy, and Murda Mook

“I do this for my chicks that don’t rest
Don’t stop until you the best”


(click here to watch on YouTube)


The Cypher 1.0: Cortez, DNA, Ms Fit, Da Don


(click here to watch on YouTube)


2014 BET Hip-Hop Awards Cypher: Goodz, T Rex, Tsu Surfer, & Rain 910


(click here to watch on YouTube)


BET Hip Hop Awards 2014 Cypher: David Banner, Treach, Vic Mensa, Snow tha Product, and King Los

My jaw literally dropped during this one.


(click here to watch on YouTube)

 


Contributing Editor

Alexis Smithers is a twenty one year old explosion of messes. They are queer black writer that was published in a book about how horses heal (Wild at Heart by Heather Kirby), and has work that can be found on theEEEL. Fun facts: they tied a pillowcase to their back and tried to fly after seeing Sky High, their mantra can be found in Wreck-It Ralph, The Babadook, or Orphan Black (depending on the day) and they’re terrified of mostly everything but art makes the fear easier to hold.


Poetry For Movers—Movement In Space, Time and Self


Running Foxes by Gladys Paulus

The Last July

…Still, the clocks in this house get smaller

every day with acres and acres of dirt

ready to claim us. When I say,

at last, I am completely flattened,

how is it that loss

can always find

more room?

– from Mammoth by Rachel McKibbens

Elegy (For Marge and Nathan Sands)

…But today, even from New York, my home in Cincinnati

is still folding around me like and egg. It isn’t yet the city

in which my father will leave my mother. Or the city to

which he’ll return. Or the two weeks between that I won’t

remember. Or the two weeks after he comes home but

isn’t really home. Or the decade we’ll spend pretending it

didn’t happen. Or the years I will immediately fall asleep

each time my mother mentions her own sadness.

– from The New Clean by Jon Sands

Release It

…Worth is not a well to be poisoned

it is not a tumbler being filled or



drank from by some audacious God,

nor a monthly allowance we get

when we are not beautiful.

Drive to the ocean. No, drive to



the Redwoods. Drive to whatever

landmark reminds you that

becoming is a slow glory and leave

your shame. It will not follow you home.

– from We Slept Here by Sierra DeMulder

I want to have children so they can one day grow old and watch me die


…Her body is starting to give up on her.



Her mind is telling her it’s over

and her heart beats this every two beats.



Will I be there when my mother dies



or will it be something



I only see



in me?

– from It Starts From The Belly and Blooms by Thomas Fucaloro

Late Night Speech With My Brother

…It is not

too late. Your life is ahead of you,

behind you is thirty years of

death- I have seen a man of eighty

drop his parents hands and just walk the other way

– from The Dead and The Living by Sharon Olds

Contributing Editor


SaraEve Fermin is a performance poet and epilepsy advocate from New Jersey. An East Coast heart jumping circus trains, she is the editor-in-chief of Wicked Banshee Press. Nowadays can be found volunteering at National Poetry Slam Events. She is a Women of the World Poetry Slam Competitor and her work can be found in GERM Magazine, Drunk In A Midnight Choir, Free Verse Magazine and Transcendence among others. Her second book of poetry, The View From The Top of the Ferris Wheel, will be published by Emphat!c Press in 2015. She believes in the power of foxes and self publishing.


On Disrupting the Silence — Part One


Print by Raw Art Letterpress

Last week, I made a vow to myself to tell the truth more. There are lots of answers to why I would do this, but only one question as to how — How do I break the silence? These are a bunch of words that I’ve carried around since I’ve started to get better. They help me break my silence and I hope they can help you too.

Beginning


“You guys know about vampires? … You know, vampires have no reflections in a mirror? There’s this idea that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. And what I’ve always thought isn’t that monsters don’t have reflections in a mirror. It’s that if you want to make a human being into a monster, deny them, at the cultural level, any reflection of themselves. And growing up, I felt like a monster in some ways. I didn’t see myself reflected at all. I was like, “Yo, is something wrong with me? That the whole society seems to think that people like me don’t exist?“ And part of what inspired me, was this deep desire that before I died, I would make a couple of mirrors. That I would make some mirrors so that kids like me might see themselves reflected back and might not feel so monstrous for it.” — Junot Diaz


Poems

The School of Fury by Chen Chen

“& everyone just nods & I want to say No, & scream, & punch Robert Frost in the teeth.

& take everyone through the wound of it.”

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The Double Blind by Tafisha A. Edwards

“Can you name your attacker?”

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Old Heart by Fortesa Latifi

“OLD HEART CROSSED HERSELF AND HOPED TO DIE
STUFFED COTTON BALLS INTO HER MOUTH AND CHOKED”

○○○○○○○○

To My Father/My Unborn Son by Ocean Vuong

“Because what you heard, or will hear, is true: I wrote
a better world onto the page
& watched the fire take it back.”

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Exit Wound by Jeananne Verlee

“you are an exit wound
a name I cannot bring myself
to say aloud”

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Conjuring: A Lesson in Words and Ghosts by Jacqui German

“is talking about & is talking about & is talking about & is talking about & is talking about & is talking about & is talking about & just like that, the whole room is haunted.“

○○○○○○○○

For the Offended by Donna-Marie Riley

“It is not my job to write gently.
I am not here to make you comfortable.”


Books

Sparklefat by Melissa May Dunn

“All of them have no more fucks to give about a world that wants them to be quiet.”

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Crush by Richard Siken

“I make up things
I would never say. I say them very quietly.”

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What We Buried by Caitlyn Siehl

“I will go to my grave with the memory
of bravery in my bones.
I am not ashamed of any of it.
Not the closed door in my face
or the static silence of my phone
for weeks after.
I was not afraid.
I am still not afraid.”

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This Way to the Sugar by Hieu Minh Nguyen

“That’s all. That’s all.
I have nothing else to say”

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The Moment by T.C. Anderson

“She studies your answers like they’re written in Greek, and she needs to decipher them to survive. You want everyone to hang on your words like that.”

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The Other Side: A Memoir by Lacy M. Johnson

“Sometimes flashes of poetry are all that we can find in the wreckage; sometimes these flashes are all that can possibly save us, brought together for brief, burning instants, and then let go.”

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Bring Down the Chandeliers by Tara Hardy

“As our hound hones his scent, all the children I ever wasn’t but was meant to be, break open the roof, take wing, and I speak speak.”

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I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Dr. Maya Angelou

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside of you.”

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Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison

“All of us were screaming and no one could help.”

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The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely

“The problem is that you don’t always get to write your own story. You get written into some stories, and if ask why, there isn’t an answer. You don’t have any control, because the forces at work are too large to confront, and sometimes too large even to understand.”

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Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

“Like maybe he really, truly believes I’m worth listening to, worth saving.”

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Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

“When people don’t express themselves, they die one piece at a time.”

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The History of Love by Nicole Krauss

“All I want is not to die on a day when I went unseen.”

 


Contributing Editor

Alexis Smithers is a twenty one year old explosion of messes. They are queer black writer that was published in a book about how horses heal (Wild at Heart by Heather Kirby), and has work that can be found on theEEEL. Fun facts: they tied a pillowcase to their back and tried to fly after seeing Sky High, their mantra can be found in Wreck-It Ralph, The Babadook, or Orphan Black (depending on the day) and they’re terrified of mostly everything but art makes the fear easier to hold.