Category Archives: Jade Mitchell


Sway This Way: Bone Tongue by Scherezade Siobhan| Review


52 pgs, published by Thought Catalog Books, Kindle, $4.99
Order from Amazon
Review by Jade Mitchell


Scherezade Siobhan’s Bone Tongue is an evolution, to say the least.

Bone Tongue glimpses at the aspects of life that break you down, leading to the stripping away of those parts of you and re-moulding them into something new.

What stands out for me is the rawness of Scherezade’s poetry. The collection itself is a diary, each poem detailing the thoughts and emotions focused within that day. The first day is titled: SPEAK YOUR SPINE, a bold title for a bold poem that tells you to push yourself past human boundary.

“be sin and scandal.
be the lipstick stain on a smoking gun.
be the garter under the habit of a nun.
be more blatant than the african sun.”

In these days, Scherezade presents us with poems that flicker onto the past, pushing yourself into that darkness to become one with it, to learn how to grow beyond it. A PHOENIX TOO FREQUENT focuses on this confrontation, the acceptance of what you once went through in order to continue moving forward.


“forgiving your past is the sound of a light
bulb being switched off in the distance.
the brief reluctance of a snap in the electricity
as it unchains a legion of horses
cornered between fingertips.”


But what compels me towards Scherezade Siobhan’s work is the message conceived within her imagery. It is delicate, raw, and unique in it’s own way. Scherezade conveys emotion so strongly. A HEART IS A KNIFE IN DISGUISE captures the transition of feeling, with tender love turning to a hostile anger towards the one you love.

“tell me how are we not christened cannibals yet?
aren’t we feeding off of each other’s disease :

bait-heft drag of inflated traumas, nutshell
rudiments of forgetting; we make our bodies
into shared purgatories.”

But beyond these emotions of love and anger, one triumphs all. The last poem within the collection: BE DONE, notes the compliance towards being second-best, over-looked, and battling those darker sides of yourself. BE DONE exerts this frustration, this repetition of what breaks you down before finally, you’re rid of it. And you begin again.

“Be done.
with learning to live like a shoplifting shoot-out.
with learning to walk enfeebled by the polio of doubt.
with putting a silencer on your tongue
every time you wanted to shout.”

This review is not enough to capture the intensity and beauty of this collection, but I hope this brief glimpse of it urges you to seek this treasure out for yourself.


Scherezade Siobhan is a psychologist, writer and the maker of world’s finest Spanish omelettes. Her work has been published/is forthcoming in tNY.Press, Bluestem Magazine, Black & BLUE Writing, Cordite Poetry Review, The Nervous Breakdown, Electric Cereal, Mandala, Fruita Pulp & others. She owns and runs a small independent publishing outfit called Cyberhex Press & her first poetry collection Bone Tongue was published by Thought Catalog Books in 2015. She can be found squeeing about small furry animals, football (the proper kind) & neuroscience on Tumblr @ viperslang or on Twitter @zaharaesque


Contributing Editor


Jade Mitchell is an 18 year old poet / writer who resides near Glasgow, Scotland. Her work has been featured in The Grind Journal, Inky Paper and Ink Scotland. Aside from working on her writing and poetry, you can find her listening to Lorde and reading every poem she can find in sight.


Sway This Way: Rolling Holy in the Dirt by Misha Brandon Speck | Review


62 pgs, perfect bound soft cover, handmade, $7
Order from Stray Arrow Press
Review by Jade Mitchell


Rolling Holy in the Dirt is an poetic execution of emotion and memory. This exploration of loss Misha Brandon Speck has created sinks you into the aftermath of losing someone and how you can continue to live through the emptiness and isolation.

Divided into three sections, Misha explores the emptiness we feel through the traces of a person that still linger once they have been removed from our lives. Poems such as “The Ghost” create a delicate imagery, immersing you within the memory until you feel at one with it.

“traces of you
on the porch
on the windowsill

evicted from mouths,
secondhand smoke in our clothes.”

However, as the chapbook rolls into its second section, the poems become a progression of trying to move on from this state of being. In poems such as “Guilt Trash”, Misha focuses on the feelings of guilt we encounter when trying to rid ourselves of the past, and settles onto the ways we can move on without leaving it behind.


”Why have we been wasting the first decades
of the 21st century staring up at the stars for
new worlds
when we could pioneer a new life


on top of the mess
we left from the last one?”


But what is also captured innocently within the second section is the progression in learning to love again, whether it be for another person or for the life you lead. Misha shows a realisation for change which is something that exists deep within us all, the moment when you become so tired that you push yourself towards something new.

“Sometimes when you remember what
you are it makes you want revolution

or at least something to that effect.”

As the book progresses into its final section, we are greeted with poems that flower. This section focuses on the new-found connections that blossom, and the passage of time from one year to the next, that evolves our very lives.

“I hope none of it is true, what
they say about the distance. I hope none of it’s
true, what they say. I can’t hear it over the sound
of standing in a city other than my own trying to
stretch love over these lines in the road.”

Rolling Holy in The Dirt is a collection gritted with reflection, full of mournful yearning before transitioning into hope, into light.

“we leave parts of ourselves pink
like the flowers inside us.”


Misha Brandon Speck isn’t an artist or whatever, but definitely likes writing poems, making music, taking photographs, and writing short biographical quips in the third person. They live in Portland, Oregon and has a certificate in independent publishing from the IPRC.


Contributing Editor


Jade Mitchell is an 18 year old poet / writer who resides near Glasgow, Scotland. Her work has been featured in The Grind Journal, Inky Paper and Ink Scotland. Aside from working on her writing and poetry, you can find her listening to Lorde and reading every poem she can find in sight.


Word Dance’s Package to a Creative Summer!



June has finally arrived, and you all know what that means…

SUMMER’S FINALLY HERE!

So whilst you all bask in the glory of the summer heat with a great read (or begin the great crusade of TV shows and movies awaiting you on Netflix), I’ve decided to create a Summer poetry package filled with prompts, poetry and music to get you and your creative juices flowing!


Recommendations + Articles:

‘Fishtail by the Scyamore Tree’ – Yasmin Belkhyr

‘The Nosebleed Year’ – Ava Goga

We, Gold Girl – Scherezade Siobhan

Four Poems by Cecilia Woloch

Late Sunday Morning by Elana Bell

Cosmology in Five Acts by Caroline Rayner

Warm Teeth by Eleanor Hazard

Jenny Holzer & her Inflammatory Essays

Winter Tangerine Review’s Shedding Skins


Prompt List:

1. Bedroom­Bound

2. Emptied Hallways

3. Skipped Stones Down by the Creek

4. Awaking after Sunset

5. Summer Love / Loss

6. The History We Make

7. Bonfires in Daylight

8. Burning the Bridges

9. What We Yearned For

10. What Awaits Us


CLICK HERE TO LISTEN


8tracks Tracklist:

Holidays – Lydia

Let Me In – GroupLove

No Better – Lorde

Never Gonna Change – Broods

I Wanna Get Better – Bleachers

The Exit – Lydia

Twenty Years – Bad Suns

Home – Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros

All is Well (Goodbye Goodbye) – Radical Face


If you’ve decided to carry out the prompts, then I’d love to see them! You can either comment your pieces on our Facebook post or even submit them to my blog, Happy writing!


Contributing Editor


Jade Mitchell is an 18 year old poet / writer who resides near Glasgow, Scotland. Her work has been featured in The Grind Journal, Inky Paper and Ink Scotland. Aside from working on her writing and poetry, you can find her listening to Lorde and reading every poem she can find in sight.


Poetry On The Go: Five Podcasts To Get Your Poetry Fix

We all need a little poetry in our lives, right?

Whether it be through dog-eared books, online journals, or through this very website, there are always ways to get your poetry fix. But if you’re looking for something a little different, I’ve created a list of excellent poetry podcasts that will blow your mind (and ears) with such an wide array of talent available! Let’s begin, shall we?

Voicemail Poems

Described as “missed calls you actually want to hear”, ‘Voicemail Poems’ presents a unique twist to the genre of spoken word poetry. Created by poet John Mortara, this podcast creates a sense of communication with poet’s leaving recordings of their poems through voicemails. With a whole host of poems to choose from, “Voicemail Poems” presents originality and style to the spoken word genre.




Subcity Radio’s Rhyming Optional

A selection of Scottish talent now, with ‘Rhyming Optional’, A monthly radio show broadcasting the latest in Scottish spoken word poetry. Hosted by the talented spoken word poet Kevin P.Gilday, “Rhyming Optional” debuts a mixture of the latest in spoken word talent with a fine selection of music to accompany it, making it a feast to listen to.




Read Poetry and Eventually Die

A fairly new podcast aimed at changing the discourse and social commentary of poetry, it features a mixture of contemporary and classic poetry of which Steve Roggenbuck breaks down and picks at, analysing what messages he perceives from the work. His enthusiastic and quirky approach to the subjects of poetic style and delivery is an infectious sound that you can’t help but keep listening to.




Write About Now

“Write About Now” provides the latest in American slam poetry, directly from Houston, Texas. It streams half an hour segments of shows, focusing on the latest mainstream poets to grace the stages of America. It features the likes of: Clementine Von Radics, Alex Dang, Ebony Stewart and Derrick Brown. This podcast focuses on the powerful and the dynamic, making it an incredible listen and a firm favourite.




The Indiefeed Poetry Podcast

The Indiefeed Poetry Podcast was created by Indiefeed to collect and showcase extracts of performance poetry from a whole host of popular poets. With the likes of JeanAnn Verlee, Andrea Gibson, and Jeremy Radin gracing the airwaves, this podcast features an extensive back catalogue, making it the perfect podcast to start immersing yourself into spoken word.



Contributing Editor


Jade Mitchell is an 18 year old poet / writer who resides near Glasgow, Scotland. Her work has been featured in The Grind Journal, Inky Paper and Ink Scotland. Aside from working on her writing and poetry, you can find her listening to Lorde and reading every poem she can find in sight.


Sway This Way: Kissing Angles by Sarah Fletcher | REVIEW


32 pgs, £4
Order from Dead Ink or Amazon.
Review by Jade Mitchell


Kissing Angles is not your typical exploration of love.


Sarah Fletcher slips through the surface and explores the cracks beneath, for this isn’t love that we know of. This love is darker. Whether it be through playful visions of lovers dressed in drag, or through love affairs with boys from New Orleans, what Fletcher brilliantly captures is the kind of love that causes friction – the electric pulse that connects you with another. Through poems such as “The Wrestler and The Sailor’s Daughter”, Fletcher captures this intensity instantly.

“As she moves on him
like an approaching tide,
she says she wants
to match his skin, be turned
to pearl string purple,
just like him.”


But it isn’t just love that Fletcher delves into. It’s the repercussion of it. Fletcher looks into the loss and the longing for what once was, capturing the highly-strung emotion. 
One of her strongest poems, “This Villanelle Has Two Endings” explores this perfectly. With the juxtaposing stanzas building up the essence of hope, it also reveals the barren reality, that the golden image of your ideal future may not always come true.


“You hold my hand, and hold our child’s too.
(The bleeding will subside. I leave the room.)”


What Fletcher also takes influence from is the love affairs of the past. From history, she picks women such as the Kraut Girls and Eva Braun; all of whom faced prejudice throughout their lives for the love they indulged in. She pinpoints the prejudice that the Kraut Girls faced due to their supposed betrayal for the men that captivated their hearts, whilst capturing the intensity of Eva’s relationship with Adolf Hitler from her own perspective.

“Against my yellow hair, he said I looked like flame.
He touched me, then, and did not burn.”

Kissing Angles is love cracked open, with Sara Fletcher conjuring the hunger, the ambition and the rawness of the feeling, making it a powerful read from a promising poet.

Sarah Fletcher is a young British-American poet. In 2012, she was a Foyle Young Poet, and in 2013, She won the Christopher Tower Poetry Prize. She has been published in The Rialto, the Morning Star, and The London Magazine. Her debut pamphlet ‘Kissing Angles’, ‘a sexy, witty, bold collection’ (Gillian Clarke), is available on Dead Ink.


Contributing Editor


Jade Mitchell is an 18 year old poet / writer who resides near Glasgow, Scotland. Her work has been featured in The Grind Journal, Inky Paper and Ink Scotland. Aside from working on her writing and poetry, you can find her listening to Lorde and reading every poem she can find in sight.